Dr Geoff V. Merrett
www.geoffmerrett.co.uk
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News and Impact


This page shows some of the impact that my research has had.

#60

   

ECS Summer School 2015 a Success!
31st July 2015

The ECS Summer School 2015 Participants
The ECS Summer School 2015 Participants
Over 70 prospective undergraduate students from across the UK and beyond enjoyed taking part in our annual Electronics and Computer Science summer school this year.

The week-long residential course included lab work, lectures, and visits to specialist facilities, such as the Tony Davies High Voltage Laboratory, the Southampton Nanofabrication Centre and Professor Mark Nixon's Biometric Gait Chamber. The summer school also gave participants the opportunity to experience university living, through staying in halls of residence and attending social events such as a quiz and a barbeque - as well as eating takeaways!

The summer school was a decided success, with 100% of participants agreeing or strongly agreeing that they really enjoyed taking part in the course, and now feel more informed about degrees and careers in electronics and computer science. Following the course, 44 students are intending to apply for degrees in electronics or computer science, with 80% of participants intending to apply to the University of Southampton as one of their choices. We were delighted that over a quarter of participants were girls, a figure greatly above the national average for female students enrolled on electronics and computer science degrees.

Johanna from Dorset, a participant, commented: "I think I can echo what everyone else is saying. Thank you so much to everyone that helped organise this and gave me the most amazing University experience; I am definitely doing a Bachelors in Computer Science!"

Next year's electronics and computer science summer school at the University of Southampton will take place from 25-29 July 2016. Students about to start Year 12 can register their interest now at www.summerschool.ecs.soton.ac.uk.

To find out more, see some of the press coverage that we received at:

For more information, click here.
 

#58

   

PRiME Demonstrates Research at DATE 2015
12th March 2015

The PRiME Exhibition Booth at DATE 2015
The PRiME Exhibition Booth at DATE 2015
Photo copyright Fei Xia, 2015
PRiME researchers are demonstrating our research this week at the DATE 2014 Exhibition in Grenoble, France. The exhibition stand was led by Gerry Scott, PRiME Impact Manager, and showcased a selection of the research activities being undertaken on the Programme at Southampton.

This included a number of technology demonstrators: DATE is a leading international event and unique networking opportunity for design and engineering of Systems-on-Chip, Systems-on-Board and Embedded Systems Software.

For more information, click here.
 

#56

   

Davide wins Silver in SET for Britain 2015
9th March 2015

Davide Zilli at the SET for Britain Competition
Davide Zilli at the SET for Britain Competition
One of the PhD students in my team, Davide Zilli, won the silver medal (second place) at the SET for BRITAIN 2015 competition at the House of Commons in London. Competing against 59 other PhD students, postdocs and early-career researchers from around Great Britain, Davide presented his poster to researchers and politicians. His poster was on his research into the use of smartphones for biodiversity monitoring, in particular the hunt for the New Forest Cicada. His success also gained him a £2000 prize!

Miss Angieszka Dzielendziak, from the Faculty of Engineering and the Environment at the University of Southampton, was awarded the bronze medal.

For more information, click here.
 

#54

   

PRiME: Fully Funded PhD Studentships
1st December 2014

The PRiME Project
The PRiME Project
The PRiME Project at the University of Southampton is offering 2x 3.5 year fully-funded PhD Studentship. Candidates with an excellent qualification in Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electronics or a related discipline are encouraged to apply. Applications must be received by the end of June 2015; however, you are encouraged to apply early, as we will award the scholarship as soon as a suitable candidate has been found).

PRiME (www.prime-project.org) is a high-profile UK funded interdisciplinary project led by Southampton and bringing together four universities (Southampton, Imperial College, Manchester and Newcastle) with expertise in the research areas of low-power, highly-parallel, reconfigurable and dependable computing and verified software design. Working in collaboration with five companies (ARM, Imagination Technologies, Altera, Microsoft Research and Freescale), PRiME is tackling the challenge of developing the theory and practice of future high-performance embedded systems utilising many-core processors.

PRiME is led by Professor Bashir Al-Hashimi at the University of Southampton. The University's Department of Electronics and Computer Science, one of the largest and most distinguished in the UK, has an international reputation for education, research and enterprise as evidenced by the successful ARM-ECS Research Centre. With over 400 PhD students conducting research into areas of electronics and computer science, Southampton is a vibrant environment for postgraduate research.

We are offering 2 PhD Studentships for 3.5 years with an expected start date of October 2015 to carry out research in all hardware and software aspects of PRiME research. This will include, but not limited to, areas of energy-efficient and reliable hardware architectures, run-time management algorithms, operating systems for mobile systems, modelling and performance analysis and profiling tools. A collaborative approach to research will be vital within PRiME and candidates will be expected to work closely with researchers from partner institutions, including visits to industrial collaborators' sites and internships.

The 3.5yr studentships offered include tuitions fees (UK and EU students) and provide an annual tax-free stipend of at least £13863 pa to cover living costs (EU students may be eligible, see the eligibility rules).

For more information, click here.
 

#52

   

ECS Summer School 2015
31st October 2014

The 2014 Electronics Summer School at Southampton
The 2014 Electronics Summer School at Southampton
Do you enjoy maths, technology or science?

For the second year running, I am organising a one-week residential course (27th - 31st July 2015) to enable 16 and 17 year-old students to apply their skills to computer science and electronic engineering, working in groups and investigating and designing solutions to real projects in our undergraduate labs. As well as experiencing the facilities on campus, and taking part in labs and lectures, they will be living in halls and enjoying a busy programme on the University of Southampton campus.

I am leading the course with Dr Reena Pau, ECS Outreach Coordinator. To be eligble for the course, students should be aged 16+ when the course begins; studying maths and one of Physics, Electronics, Computing or Further Maths at A-level; and have mostly A/A* grades at GCSE.

For more information, click here.
 

#50

   

PRiME featured on Cover of New Electronics
14th October 2014

The PRiME Southampton Team
The PRiME Southampton Team
We were recently interviewed by the New Electronics magazine, who was interested in our research on the PRiME (Power and Reliability in Many-core Embedded systems) project. As a result, it was featured as a cover-story in the 14 October 2014 issue.

Specifically to me, the article comments:
A future challenge for many core systems is that application developers will face architectures that are changing all the time and it is unrealistic to expect them to alter their code constantly to deal with this.

Dr Geoff Merrett, who is leading PRiME's application theme, said "We are trying to protect them - for instance, the runtime system will take care of jobs like deciding at what speed the processor will run. But we will also need some information from them, like what quality of service is needed in areas like video decoding.

"Generally, applications for many core systems are evolving and can be expected to be vastly different in five years; they will be selected and refined throughout PRiME's duration", he said.

Pushing embedded systems up to hundreds, even thousands, of cores will be one of the most demanding challenges the electronic industry has ever faced. If it succeeds, PRiME will have been a true pioneer of that development.


For more information, click here.
 

#48

   

PRiME Video on Run-Time Energy Management
29th July 2014

Video about Run-Time Energy Management
Video about Run-Time Energy Management
I recently recorded a video about our current research into runtime management for energy efficiency.

The research is being conducted as part of the PRiME project, and this particular strand of work has been led by PhD student Luis Maeda.

For more information, click here.
 

#46

   

Autonomous Street Light Simulator
21st February 2014

The StreetlightSim website
The StreetlightSim website
StreetlightSim has been produced as part of Sei Ping Lau's, a member of my research team, PhD research project. The simulator is an open source streetlight simulation environment based on the well-known OMNet++ and SUMO tools. It features a customisable road traffic pattern, described by the road traffic distribution according to different times of day and annual average daily traffic flow (AADF), and can be easily extended to different streetlight networks using OpenStreetMap and JOSM.

StreetlightSim has been developed specifically to evaluate Autonomous and Adaptive Street Lighting Schemes. We have used it to evaluate the performance of various street lighting schemes based on an actual streetlight network in terms of their energy efficiency and utility to road users. You can find out more about the research by downloading our paper:

Sei Ping Lau, Merrett, G.V., White, N.M., 'Energy-efficient street lighting through embedded adaptive intelligence,' Advanced Logistics and Transport (ICALT), 2013 International Conference on, pp.53-58, 29-31 May 2013.

To find out more, click the link below to visit the StreetlightSim website and download it!

For more information, click here.
 

#44

   

h-index of 10
10th October 2013

My Google Scholar Profile
My Google Scholar Profile
One of the ways that academics can judge the 'impact' of their research, is by the number of citations that their papers get - in other words, the number other researchers have found a particular paper useful. One of the metrics that is increasingly used to turn this list of numbers into a meaningful statistic for an individual is the h-index.

Put simply, an academic's h-index means that h of their papers has been cited at least h times.

At the time of writing, my h-index is 10 - meaning that 10 of my papers have been cited at least ten times! Hopefully this will only continue to grow!

For more information, click here.
 

#42

   

Elsevier Journal Paper "Highly Downloaded"
8th October 2013

Computers and Electronics in Agriculture
Computers and Electronics in Agriculture
Today we were notified that our paper 'The impact of agricultural activities on water quality: A case for collaborative catchment-scale management using integrated wireless sensor networks' is the 12th most downloaded article in the Elsevier Journal on Computers and Electronics in Agriculture over the previous 90 days.

Edit: as of October 2013, the paper has received 482 views.

Edit: as of December 2013, the paper has received 791 views, and is the 16th most downloaded article in the Elsevier Journal on Computers and Electronics in Agriculture over the previous 90 days.

A copy can also be downloaded from our institutional ePrints repository, using the link below.

For more information, click here.
 

#40

   

Recipient of an IEEE Award
12th September 2013

Southampton
Southampton's IEEE Student Branch
I am the recipient of a prestigious "Region 8 IEEE Outstanding Branch Counselor and Advisor Award" for my continued support of the University of Southampton's fantastic IEEE Student Branch.

The IEEE grant these annual awards to approximately 10 outstanding individuals around the world who, through their work as Counselors and Advisors, exemplify the Institute's commitment to the educational, personal, professional, and technical development of students in IEEE related fields of interest [source: IEEE, 2013].

I have a very strong attachment to the University's IEEE Student Branch, having served on its committee in one form or another for nearly a decade. The student-run branch put on a fantastic and varied programme each year, and have gone from strength to strength since the branch was founded. An example of this can be seen by the other awards that the branch recently won.

For more information, click here.
 

#38

   

General Co-Chair of ENSSys 2013
4th September 2013

This year, I am serving as the General Co-Chair of the 1st International Workshop on Energy Neutral Sensing Systems (ENSSys 2013). The workshop will be held in conjunction with SenSys 2013 - considered to be one of the two top conferences in the areas of sensor networks and sensing systems. The workshop will be held on November 14th, in the beautiful city of Rome, Italy.

We had an excellent set of submissions for the workshop, which are currently under peer review, and it is fantastic that the community is supporting this new addition. I look forward to meeting you at the workshop in November 2013!

For more information, click here.
 

#36

   

Best Paper Award at IJCAI 2013
15th July 2013

Davide Zilli receiving the award
Davide Zilli receiving the award
Our paper titled "A hidden Markov model-based acoustic cicada detector for crowdsourced smartphone biodiversity monitoring" received the award for Outstanding Student Paper at the International Joint Conference for Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI), 2013. The conference was held in Beijing, China, and the paper was presented by Davide Zilli.

Abstract: Automated acoustic recognition of species aims to provide a cost-effective method for biodiversity monitoring. This is particularly appealing for detecting endangered animals with a distinctive call, such as the New Forest cicada. To this end, we pursue a crowdsourcing approach, whereby the millions of visitors to the New Forest will help to monitor the presence of this cicada by means of a smartphone app that can detect its mating call. However, current systems for acoustic insect classification are aimed at batch processing and not suited to a real-time approach as required by this system, because they are too computationally expensive and not robust to environmental noise. To address this short-coming we propose a novel insect detection algorithm based on a hidden Markov model to which we feed as a single feature vector the ratio of two key frequencies extracted through the Goertzel algorithm. Our results show that this novel approach, compared to the state of the art for batch insect classification, is much more robust to noise while also reducing the computational cost.

For more information, click here.
 

#34

   

Presenting at the Times Cheltenham Science Festival
7th June 2013

Dr Merrett presenting at the Times Cheltenham Science Fair
Dr Merrett presenting at the Times Cheltenham Science Fair
It was a great pleasure to have been invited to speak at the Times Cheltenham Science Festival 2013. I took part in a panel session exploring the background and future possibilities of Energy Harvesting with Dr Paul Mitcheson and heart surgeon Sukumaran Nair. In the presentation to a sold-out crowd of 100 members of the general public, I gave an overview of the motivation for energy harvesting, and spoke about some of our recent EPSRC funded research in the area. It was a very enjoyable experience, and the session seemed to be very well received with many interesting discussions with attendees afterwards.

I was walking amongst giants, as other speakers at this year's Science Fair included Professor Peter Higgs, the man who the recently discovered Higgs particle is named after! Further information on my appearance can be found on one of ECS' news articles.

The Times Cheltenham Science Festival is a six-day celebration of science, engineering and the arts aimed solely at the general public. It is widely acclaimed as the UK's leading science festival and is renowned for its creative programming. It aims to present a broad range of science and scientific issues in an exciting and engaging environment - through a variety of formats including debates, panel discussions, single speaker talks, interactive workshops and exhibitions. The Festival continues to grow each year, with 39,000 tickets issued in 2012 and 17,000 visitors at free exhibitions and events.

"Cheltenham is really the gold standard for science festivals"
- Professor Lord Winston

"The Cheltenham Science Festival is, without doubt, the premier science festival in the country because it is supported by pretty much everyone who cares about promoting science in Britain"
- Professor Brian Cox

For more information, click here.
 

#32

   

I Cross the 50-Publications Mark!
8th May 2013

The number of papers I have published has now crossed the '50' mark!

My first paper was published in 2004, as a result of my undergraduate dissertation project, supervised by Prof. Bashir Al-Hashimi. Since then, my publications have continued, and escalated in recent years - largely thanks to the excellent team of researchers that I have working on projects with me.

Next stop: 100!

For more information, click here.
 

#30

   

Workshop Event Showcases our Energy Harvesting Research
11th February 2013

Tom Kazmierski and I at the Showcase
Tom Kazmierski and I at the Showcase
Photo copyright Andrey Mokhov, 2013
Our project on 'Holistic Energy Harvseting' has now come to an end, and we held a workshop at Imperial College London on 11 February 2013 to showcase the project's demonstrators and research findings.

Attendees found out about the project's objectives and achievements, following by an interactive showcase of the project's demonstrators and research outputs. A particular emphasis of the event was giving attendees the opportunity to interact with the project's researchers and academics. In the afternoon, a series of technical seminars discussed various areas of the research in more depth. The day was designed to give attendees the flexibility to either drop-in for the project overview and demonstrations, or to come for the full day and get the full holistic experience!

The three-year project 'Next-Generation Energy Harvesting Electronics: Holistic Approach' was funded by the EPSRC In 2009, and involved over 25 researchers at four universities (the University of Southampton, Newcastle University, Imperial College, and the University of Bristol) in partnership with four industrial companies (Dialog Semiconductor, Diodes Incorporated, ARM, and Mentor Graphics). The research joined together different research fields, including energy harvesting and MEMS processing, efficient power-conversion electronics, low-power embedded computing systems, simulation and electronic design automation.

For more information, click here.
 

#28

   

Keynote Speaker at Sensors & their Applications XVII
19th July 2012

The conference will be held in Dubrovnik, Croatia
The conference will be held in Dubrovnik, Croatia
I have been invited to speak at the Institute of Physics' biennial conference on Sensors and their Applications. The seventeenth in the series of conferences on Sensors & their Applications (S&A XVII) will be hosted outside of the UK and Ireland for the first time in Dubrovnik, Croatia in September 2013.

This will be the 17th occurance of the conference, having began in Manchester in 1983 and included the first of the highly successful Eurosensors conference at Cambridge in 1987 and at Southampton in 1998. It was also one of the first conferences that I attended as a PhD student back in 2005!

Most notabley, it will be the first time that the conference has ventured outside of the UK and Ireland, this time being held in Dubrovnik, Croatia. The conference will take place between the 16-18 September 2013.

My talk is titled "New tricks with old sensors: pervasive technologies for novel applications", watch this space for more information!

For more information, click here.
 

#26

   

Online Presentation on Holistic Energy Harvesting
18th June 2012

Presenting at IET WSS 2012
Presenting at IET WSS 2012
Today I presented our research on Holistic Energy Harvesting at the IET conference on Wireless Sensing Systems (WSS 2012). In particular, I was talking about our system demonstrator, namely a "Vibration-Powered Sensing System for Engine Condition Monitoring".

Condition monitoring is becoming an established technique for managing the maintenance of machinery in transport applications. Vibration energy harvesting allows wireless systems to be powered without batteries, but most traditional generators have been designed to operate at fixed frequencies. The variety of engine speeds (and hence vibration frequencies) in transport applications therefore means that these are not usable. My presentation described the application-driven specification, design and implementation of a novel vibration-powered sensing system for condition monitoring of engines. This demonstrated that, through careful holistic design of the entire system, condition monitoring systems can be powered solely from machine vibration, managing their energy resources and transmitting sensed data wirelessly.

The presentation was recorded, and the slides and a video can be watched on the IET website by clicking here.



For more information, click here.
 

#24

   

Best Presentation Award at SenseCam 2012
4th April 2012

Alex Wood being awarded the Best Presentation prize
Alex Wood being awarded the Best Presentation prize
Our presentation entitled "DejaView: help with memory, when you need it" was awarded the best presentation prize at the SenseCam 2012 Symposium. The prize was awarded by Steve Hodges from Microsoft Research.

Abstract: Promising findings in the use of wearable memory aids such as SenseCam have been widely reported. However, to date, there has been relatively little consideration of the potential for offering memory help in real-time during daily living. Such assistance, in the form of proactive visual prompts comprising the four reported types of cue (people, places, objects, and actions), could help people with memory problems to immediately orientate themselves in a situation -- supplying details of where they are, or who they are with. This paper reports on the three-tier DejaView system, designed to provide such help.

DejaView works across a wearable device, a smartphone, and a remote computer, simultaneously recording a lifelog, finding appropriate cues from past experiences, and feeding relevant information back to the user. The real-time nature of this system required the design of a new wearable device, similar to SenseCam but more customisable and additionally capable of transmitting data over Bluetooth. Fitting this into the three-tier architecture allows for complex processing in the system without limiting the battery lifetime of the portable and wearable parts.

In the currently-implemented example, photos captured by the wearable device are compared against a database of faces stored on the remote computer. The user subsequently receives information about people around them via their smartphone. More generally, the architecture permits a wide range of intelligent methods for selecting useful cues, based on the user's environment, to be integrated into the system, facilitating the provision of real-time help for memory problems.

For more information, click here.
 

#22

   

Tactile Device Research on BBC Arabic's 4Tech show
25th February 2012

Being interviewed by BBC Arabic
Being interviewed by BBC Arabic's reporter Nassim Ramadan
Dr Sara Demain and I were interviewed by Nassim Ramadan of BBC Arabic's 4Tech show. 4Tech is considered to be the main Technology show in the Middle East and North Africa, watched by around 20 million people. During the interview, we explained our research into the use of tactile devices to help people regain movement and sensation when they are recovering from a stroke.

The interview was a somewhat strange experience, with all questions first being asked in Arabic (for which we had no idea what Nassim was asking, but was required to start answering anyway) and then English!

The piece aired today on Saturday 25th February 2012, and will be repeated seven times over the coming week. You can find a video of the interview on the BBC Arabic YouTube channel. I've had a go at adding English subtitles to the video - the result of merging a direct word-for-word translation with what we remember saying during the interview (hence we take no responsiblity for any inaccurate translations). The subtitled video clip can be viewed here (copyright BBC, 2012).

For more information, click here.
 

#20

   

Reseach Featured in 'New Boundaries' Magazine
25th November 2011

Dec 2011 Issue of New Boundaries
Dec 2011 Issue of New Boundaries
Our research on the use of tactile devices in stroke rehabilitation, has been featured in the latest issue of the University's biannual research magazine: 'New Boundaries'. The magazine gives a flavour of the University's broad range of research, which crosses the boundaries separating the traditional disciplines.

The 4-page article from this issue, including an interview with myself, Cheryl Metcalf and Sara Demain, can be downloaded by following this link. An excerpt from this article is shown below:

Southampton researchers are also developing novel devices that help stroke patients regain the sense of touch in their arms and hands. Dr Geoff Merrett, who is leading the project, says: "The sensory aspect of stroke rehabilitation hasn't had much attention so far, but it is vital. It's all very well being able to move your hand to pick up an object, but when you can't feel that object, you don't know whether it's slipping out of your hand or whether it's hot or cold. The devices we're designing will reinforce those perceptions."


For more information, click here.
 

#18

   

Two Papers Accepted for Publication in IEEE Transactions
26th September 2011

Our paper on supercapacitor modelling
Our paper on supercapacitor modelling
We have recently had two papers related to our work on Energy Harvesting electronics accepted for publication in the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems. Both publications are a result of the EPSRC project on 'Holistic Energy Harvesting'.

The first paper, 'Accurate Supercapacitor Modeling for Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Nodes' investigates supercapacitors, often used in energy-harvesting wireless sensor nodes (EH-WSNs) to store harvested energy. Until now, research into the use of supercapacitors in EH-WSNs has considered them to be ideal or over-simplified, with non-ideal behavior attributed to substantial leakage currents. In this brief, we show that observations previously attributed to leakage are predominantly due to redistribution of charge inside the supercapacitor. We confirm this hypothesis through the development of a circuit-based model which accurately represents non-ideal behavior. The model correlates well with practical validations representing the operation of an EH-WSN, and allows behavior to be simulated over long periods..

The second paper, 'Photovoltaic Sample-and-Hold Circuit Enabling MPPT Indoors for Low-Power Systems' presents an ultra low-power maximum power point tracking (MPPT) circuit with a novel sample-and-hold and cold-start arrangement, enabling efficient indoor MPPT (which has not been reported, or considered possible, before). The circuit is validated in practice, and the sample-and-hold behaviour analysed using real light data.

For more information, click here.
 

#16

   

Haptics Research in Government Report
11th July 2011

FAST Government Report, 2011
FAST Government Report, 2011
Our research on haptic devices for stroke rehabilitation has been featured in an annual government report on assistive technology. Our bit can be found on page 51 of the report (follow the link at the bottom of this news item).

The report is prepared by FAST (the Foundation of Assistive Technology), and is an annual publication by the Department of Health (UK Government). The report has a number of uses (including giving researchers an overview of other work in the field, and service providers information on new technologies and devices), but is also used by Government to highlight promising and successful areas of research that may require future funding.

The annual report is published pursuant to section 22 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970, and describes the wide range of government funded projects supporting the development, introduction and evaluation of assistive technology that might increase the range of activities and independence or well being of disabled and older people.

For more information, click here.
 

#14

   

DATE Paper Nominated for Best Paper Award
18th March 2011

Attendees from Southampton at DATE2011
Attendees from Southampton at DATE2011
Our 'Holistic Energy Harvesting' project was well represented at the DATE 2011 conference, with consortium members from Southampton, Newcastle and Imperial in attendance.
  • Four papers from the Holistic project were accepted for publication at the conference
  • The consortium shared a stand with the Energy Harvesting Network, giving attendees to the exhibition the opportunity to see videos, presentations, posters and demonstrators on the project, alongside holding discussions with consortium members.
  • Dr. Paul Mitcheson co-organised a special day on "Intelligent Energy Management - Supply and Utilisation".
From the four papers presented at the conference, one ("Accelerated simulation of tunable vibration energy harvesting systems using a linearised state-space technique") is a candidate for a best-paper award.

For more information, click here.
 

#12

   

Launch of My New Website
1st January 2011

http://geoffmerrett.co.uk/
http://geoffmerrett.co.uk/
Today sees the launch of a major website redesign. Visually, it might not look like much of a change, but a lot has changed under the bonnet. Hopefully there's now a lot more information on here and, more importantly for me, it is much easier for me to actually keep it up-to-date... The three most noticeable additions that you may have spotted are:
  1. 'News and Impact': a page that contains information on major developments in my research, and specifically some of the ways that this research has had an impact outside of the lab!
  2. 'Research Team': a page containing information on my current (and past) team of researchers, PhD students, and intern students. This page also gives information on how to join the team!
  3. 'Research': my research page(s) have finally seen a complete overhaul to bring the up-to-date with my research over the past couple of years. Hopefully I'll do a better job of maintaining this from now on!
Now I just need to get around to redesigning and populating the photography section of the website...

For more information, click here.
 

#10

   

EH Network Dissemination Event
15th December 2010

Attendees at Energy Harvesting 2011
Attendees at Energy Harvesting 2011
Today we announced the Energy Harvesting Network's first dissemination event, which will be held at the IET, London on 7th February 2011. This one-day event will provide a platform for disseminating advances in energy-harvesting technology and research in the UK.

Keynote presentations will be given by Daniel Inman and Rob van Schaijk, and these are supplemented by a full series of presentations by well-respected speakers from academia and industry. There will also be demonstrations from companies and a series of posters from postgraduate students (including a £200 prize for the best poster). We expect around 100 participants from both industry and academia, and PhD students that are presenting a poster can register for free.

For more information, click here.
 

#8

   

Tactile Devices Trialed on Stroke Patients
19th November 2010

Sarah Cunningham evaluating the tactile devices on a participant with stroke.
Sarah Cunningham evaluating the tactile devices on a participant with stroke.
'Phase 3' of the human evaluation of the haptic devices that we have been developing is now complete.

The human evaluation section of this project had four phases; phases 1, 2 and 4 testing the devices on normal subjects, with phase 3 testing on partipicants with stroke.

The information and feedback that we have received from these trials has been invaluable in influencing the design of the devices, and has uncovered a wealth of information on the sensory perception of people following stroke.

For more information, click here.
 

#6

   

Press Coverage for Instrumented Crutches
14th November 2010

Geoff Merrett and the Instrumented Crutch
Geoff Merrett and the Instrumented Crutch
My research on instrumented forearm crutches received a fantastic amount of press coverage and public interest. A selection of the online coverage that it received, at least that which I have spotted, is listed below:
 

#4

   

Energy Harvesting Network Launched
1st March 2010

The Energy Harvesting Network Website
The Energy Harvesting Network Website
The Energy Harvesting Network, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, was launched on Monday 01 March. The Network is managed by Steve Beeby and Geoff Merrett in the University of Southampton's School of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS), and will bring together UK academic and industrial researchers and end-users of energy harvesting (EH) technology.

The Network will define new research challenges and stimulate collaborative research proposals. It will also ensure more effective dissemination on the current and future capabilities of energy harvesting technologies to all potential users in both industry and academia.

If you are interested in joining the Network, please visit eh-network.org/join.php.

For more information, click here.
 

#2

   

WiSE Project Day
12th November 2008

The WiSE Project Day, in the ESD Lab
The WiSE Project Day, in the ESD Lab
WiSE held it's first 'Project Day', an intensive one-day problem-based exercise for PhD students in ECS that are researching wireless sensing related topics. Ten students took part in an intensive day which ran from 8am to 7pm! Two teams were formed, one of which was tasked with developing a piece of clinical equipment (in response to a request from a Surgeon at the local University Hospital), while the other was required to develop a sensor network to monitor our building.

The exercise promoted a wealth of discussion between researchers, and also provided everybody with a great opportunity to familiarise themselves with sensor network hardware and develop practical and problem-solving skills. The following day saw presentations from both teams, who demonstrated that they had developed solutions to their respective problems. The event was a great success, entirely thanks to the efforts of those who took part, with many requests for a similar event to be held in the future... Watch this space!

WiSE (Wireless Sensing in ECS) is an interest group bringing together researchers in ECS. WiSE operates as part of the sensor networks research theme of the PSC. WiSE addresses the 'sensor networks' research theme by bringing together researchers with a common interest in wireless sensing and sensor networks.

For more information, click here.
 
     

#59

   

Research Fellow/Senior Research Assistant Wanted!
16th March 2015

Research Opportunities on PRiME
Research Opportunities on PRiME
We are currently advertising for a research fellow/senior research assistant on the PRiME project. The closing date for applications in Monday 13th April 2015, see the link below for more information.

The successful candidate will join the PRiME Programme (www.prime-project.org): a large, dedicated and enthusiastic research team of academics, post-docs and PhD students in electronics and computer science. The team is responsible for researching the next generation of many-core embedded systems. The post-holder will lead on the delivery of PRiME's 'showcase' demonstrator(s), by undertaking a programme of application-led research and development.

The focus will be primarily on conducting application and demonstrator-focussed research to enable the demonstration of PRiME's outputs. The appointed researcher will work closely with the research being undertaken by other PRiME researchers across the consortium (Southampton, Imperial, Manchester and Newcastle), as well as PRiME's industrial partners (Altera, ARM, Freescale, Imagination Technologies, Microsoft Research).

For more information, click here.
 

#57

   

Best Paper Nomination at DATE 2015
11th March 2015

Anup Presenting his Paper at DATE 2015
Anup Presenting his Paper at DATE 2015
Photo copyright Fei Xia, 2015
Our 'PRiME' (Power and Reliability in Many-Core Embedded Systems) project was well represented at the DATE 2015 conference, with a combination of technical presentations, workshop papers and an exhibition stand showing technology demonstrators.

In particular, one of our papers "Workload uncertainty characterization and adaptive frequency scaling for energy minimization of embedded systems", presented by Dr Anup Das, was nominated for for a best-paper award.

For more information, click here.
 

#55

   

Davide Wins Faculty 3-Minute-Thesis Competition
4th March 2015

Davide Zilli
Davide Zilli
Photo copyright Jon Banfield, 2015
Congratulations go to Davide Zilli, who won first-place at the Faculty round of the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition. He competed against 9 other excellent candidates. He now goes forward to the University-round of the competition in early-May.

His talk, titled 'Monitoring endangered wildlife with Smartphones,' was on the topic of his PhD research, investigating the use of bioacoustics for smartphone-powered citizen science. In particular, the New Forest Cicada is the only cicada native to the UK and, having not been seen for many years, is at great danger of becoming extinct. Davide's research is investigating whether or not the millions of annual visitors to the New Forest National Park can be turned into mobile biodiversity sensors, using the smartphones that they carry.

For more information, click here.
 

#53

   

Southampton to host EWME 2016
1st November 2014

Microelectronics Education at Southampton
Microelectronics Education at Southampton
Photo copyright Jon Banfield, 2015
We were recently successful in our bid to host the 2016 European Workshop on Microelectronics Education (EWME).

I will be the General Chair of the event, supported by Professor Bashir Al-Hashimi as Advisory Chair.

Click below for more information!

For more information, click here.
 

#51

   

21 Lectures Delivered in Malaysia!
26th October 2014

The EEE Students and I at USMC
The EEE Students and I at USMC
I have just returned from a fortnight's intensive teaching visit to the University of Southampton's Malaysia Campus (USMC), at EduCity@Iskandar Nusjaya.

At the campus, I gave 21 lectures to students over 8 days, primarily on Digital Electronics, as part of the Electrical and Electronic Engineering degree that we deliver there. Our four year 2+2 MEng EEE degree will see the students spend the first two years studying in Malaysia before transferring to Southampton, UK, for the final two years. The EEE programme at USMC is identical to that offered at the Southampton campus, including the duplication of the outstanding ECS undergraduate laboratory facilities in Malaysia. As well as core EEE staff based at USMC, many other academic staff from Southampton will be visiting USMC over the coming year to teach on the course.

This is the second year that ECS has welcomed an intake of students at USMC on our Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EEE) degree course. USMC enrolled its first students onto Mechanical Engineering in 2012; now in their third year, these students have completed the Malaysian-based part of their course, and came to our UK campus to continue their education.



For more information, click here.
 

#49

   

ARM-ECS iCase PhD Studentship
1st October 2014

Southampton
Southampton's ARM-ECS Research Centre
The ARM-ECS Research Centre at the University of Southampton is offering a 3.5 year fully-funded PhD Studentship. The PhD student will be based in ARM, Cambridge, and supervised by researchers at both ARM and the University of Southampton. Interested candidates must be available to start their studies no later than 01 October 2015. Applications must be received by the end of June 2015; however, you are encouraged to apply early, as we will award the scholarship as soon as a suitable candidate has been found).

Candidates with an excellent qualification in Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electronics or a related discipline are encouraged to apply. You are encouraged in the first instance to send me your CV and a short (1-page max) description of your academic achievements, expertise and interests in the design and engineering of embedded systems. The proposed topic is Modelling and Design of Energy-Efficient Consumer and Enterprise Systems, but candidates who are intelligent, enthusiastic and have an interest in embedded systems are encouraged to apply.

The 3.5yr studentship offered include tuitions fees (UK and EU students) and provides an annual tax-free stipend of at least £17000 pa to cover living costs (EU students may be eligible, see the eligibility rules).



For more information, click here.
 

#47

   

Promoted to Associate Professor
3rd March 2014

I have been promoted to Associate Professor, effective immediately!

This recognises my contribution to education and research at the University, and reflects the international recognition of my work.

(in actual fact, I've been promoted to Senior Lecturer until later in 2014, when the University is renaming the role to Associate Professor)

For more information, click here.
 

#45

   

22 Lectures Delivered in Malaysia!
28th October 2013

The EEE Students and I at USMC
The EEE Students and I at USMC
I have just returned from a fortnight's intensive teaching visit to the University of Southampton's Malaysia Campus (USMC), at EduCity@Iskandar Nusjaya.

ECS welcomed our inital intake of 10 students onto our top-quality Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EEE) degree course, which has been offered for the first time this autumn at USMC. The EEE degree joins Southampton's undergraduate MEng in Mechanical Engineering that enrolled its first students at USMC in 2012.

Our four year 2+2 MEng EEE degree will see the students spend the first two years studying in Malaysia before transferring to Southampton, UK, for the final two years. The EEE programme at USMC is identical to that offered at the Southampton campus, including the duplication of the outstanding ECS undergraduate laboratory facilities in Malaysia. As well as core EEE staff based at USMC, many other academic staff from Southampton will be visiting USMC over the coming year to teach on the course.

At the campus, I gave 22 lectures to students in 9 days, primarily on Digital Electronics, as part of the Electrical and Electronic Engineering degree that we are delivering there for the first time this year.

For more information, click here.
 

#43

   

I Provide 'Expert Advice' on Haptic Technology
8th October 2013

Article on
Article on 'The Engineer'
This morning I was contacted by a journalist from 'The Engineer' magazine, who was writing a piece about research at Bristol University on the use of ultrasound as a tactile technology. The technology, which I saw demonstrated at a conference a few years ago, uses inaudible ultrasound waves to give the sensation of touch to the fingertips, and by using an array of transducers, can target the sensation at particular locations. My comments on the technology included:

"'Touchless haptics is probably the Holy Grail,' said Dr Geoff Merrett of Southampton University, who was not involved in the research but has experience developing haptic technology. 'If you look towards games consoles, everything is going away from holding things.'"

"Southampton University's Geoff Merrett has developed haptic technology for medical rehabilitation devices for stroke patients and said the UltraHaptics system could have applications in this area. 'The more realistic you can make a sense the better. The fact that you don't need to wear things would be a massive benefit for a stroke patient because often putting something on the hand is the biggest problem. Their hand tends to seize up and so to get the kind of devices we were looking at onto the fingers was quite difficult. That could be a problem in this situation because you can't stimulate the fingertip with the ultrasound system unless it can see the fingertip. But I think as we move towards less contact devices the better [it will be].'"

For more information, click here.
 

#41

   

Invited Talk at ACROSS Workshop 2013
2nd October 2013

The EU FP7-Funded ACROSS Centre
The EU FP7-Funded ACROSS Centre
I have been invited to give a talk at the 1st ACROSS Workshop on Cooperative Networked Embedded Systems, in Zagreb. The workshop, which will take place in November 2013, is funded by the EU FP7 Centre of Research Excellence for Advanced Cooperative Systems (ACROSS) project. My talk, titled "From sensors to networks: harvesting and utilising environmental energy", will discuss the role of energy harvesting in sensor nodes and sensor networks.

Abstract: With new computing paradigms on the horizon such as pervasive computing and the internet of things, interest in wireless autonomous sensing has been increasing rapidly over the past decade. One of the fundamental challenges which exists in this area is how to power such devices, where design constraints typically include being small, light-weight and long-lasting. Energy harvesting - the process of extracting electrical energy from the surrounding environment - has been hailed as a potential solution for this, but its effective integration into a complete sensing system is non-trivial. In this seminar, I will discuss some of these challenges and solutions - from the design of a single sensor node to managing energy across a complete network. Some of these aspects will be illustrated in the context of case-studies, both in constrained and real applications, including a wireless sensor performing condition monitoring on a ferry engine which is powered by a tuneable vibration-based microgenerator.

For more information, click here.
 

#39

   

Research Featured in New Scientist
12th September 2013

New Scientist Issue 2932
New Scientist Issue 2932
Our research into the use of smartphones to for biodiversity monitoring has been featured in New Scientist.

The New Forest Cicada is the only cicada native to the UK and, having not been seen for many years, is at great danger of becoming extinct. One of my PhD students, Davide Zilli, is investigating whether or not the millions of annual visitors to the New Forest National Park can be turned into mobile biodiversity sensors, using the smartphones that they carry with them.

"Biologists like Kenichi Ueda of the website iNaturalist.org are pretty excited. 'If their technique can be generalised to identify the sounds of any animal and not just cicadas, then I think the stage is set for some kind of Animal Shazam service that will tell you what crickets are chirping in your backyard, or what shrieking bird just woke you up at 4 am.'"

For more information, click here.
 

#37

   

I Visit our Malaysian Campus to Help with Admissions
28th August 2013

Me at the On-Campus Educity Sports Facilties
Me at the On-Campus Educity Sports Facilties
I have just returned from a week's visit to the University of Southampton's campus in Malaysia (USMC). The campus is part of EduCity@Iskandar Nusjaya, just a few minutes across the bridge from Singapore. I am the Senior Admissions Tutor for the EEE degree at USMC (and in the UK), and so this was a fantastic opportunity for me to find out more about the admissions process in Malaysia

During the visit, I helped with one of their Open Days, receiving many interested applicants to the campus for the day, to show them the fantastic opportunities and facilities that we have on offer at USMC. I also recorded footage for a dedicated USMC 'virtual visit day', to supplement the videos that I recorded last year about our UK campus.

In October 2013, we will be delivering our highly-rated Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EEE) degree course in Malaysia: a four year 2+2 MEng EEE degree where students spend the first two years studying in Malaysia before transferring to Southampton, UK, for the final two years. The EEE programme at USMC is identical to that offered at the Southampton campus, including the duplication of the outstanding ECS undergraduate laboratory facilities in Malaysia.

For more information, click here.
 

#35

   

Davide Offered Two Internships!
14th June 2013

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
One of the PhD students in my team, Davide Zilli, has been successful in receiving offers for two internships.

The first of these is a 6-month internship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), within the SENSEable Cities Lab.

After this, Davide will go straight to his second internship, a 3-month placement at Microsoft Research in Cambirdge, UK.

These internships are very competitive, and many congratulations to Davide!

For more information, click here.
 

#33

   

ECS to Host UK-ESF Summer School 2014
13th May 2013

The UK Electronics Skills Foundation
The UK Electronics Skills Foundation
In July 2014, ECS at the University of Southampton will be hosting the UK-Electronics Skills Foundation's (UK-ESF) annual summer school. The course will be delivered in partnership HeadStart and with contributions from the UK-ESF's University Partners. As the University of Southampton's representative/coordinator for the UKESF, I am responsible for planning and running this exciting course, supported by our excellent ECS Lab Manager and Outreach coordinator. Watch this space!

About the course: This course will give attendees the opportunity to explore a wide range of topics within electronic engineering, and provide a flavour of the academic side of undergraduate life through lectures and hands-on challenges on subjects such as communications, analogue and digital electronics, control systems, microelectronics, nanotechnology and bioelectronics. Students will also live as students in a hall of residence and will have time for a mix of independent and organised social activities in addition to the academic programme. The course is part-sponsored by industry, with support provided by ARM, Broadcom Foundation, CSR, Dialog Semiconductor, Imagination Technologies, Publitek and Jaguar Land Rover. They will be complementing the academic programme with a team project for the week and with some of their graduate engineers talking about some of the exciting and innovative work that they do. This course will show attendees how stimulating and varied electronic engineering can be as a career and the important role it plays in the technological advances valued by society.

For more information, click here.
 

#31

   

Awarded Prestigeous £5.5M EPSRC Programme Grant
18th February 2013

The PRiME Research Project
The PRiME Research Project
We have just been awarded a large EPSRC-funded Programme Grant of £5.5M (totalling £10.7M when University and Industrial contributions are included), with Professor Bashir Al-Hashimi as the Director and myself as one of the Co-Investigators. I will also have the role of Applications Leader, and are responsible for ensuring cross-layer collaboration between research partners.

The project, codename PRiME (Power-efficient, Reliable, Many-core Embedded systems), will address major challenges in the design and implementation of energy-efficient and reliable embedded systems with many-core processors.

The grant's academic collaborators are Imperial College, Manchester and Newcastle, with industrial partners ARM, Imagination Technologies, Altera, Freescale and Microsoft Research. The project will be launching in the next couple of months - watch this space!

For more information, click here.
 

#29

   

IEEE Sensors Journal Paper Among 25 Most Downloaded
6th August 2012

Today we were notified that our paper 'Modeling of Wireless Sensor Nodes Powered by Tunable Energy Harvesters: HDL-Based Approach' (a copy can also be downloaded from our institutional ePrints repository) is one of the 25 most downloaded Sensors Journal papers in the month of June 2012. Included in this ranking are all Sensors Journal papers published since its foundation, about 1000 papers in total.

The paper is a result of work done at Southampton as part of the Holistic Energy Harvesting project. This EPSRC-funded project involves four UK universities (Southampton, Newcastle, Imperial College, and Bristol) and over 25 researchers. Our IEEE Sensors Journal paper is just one of (at the time of writing) 34 papers published as a result of the project.

For more information, click here.
 

#27

   

I Begin to trial DejaView!
17th July 2012

Two photos from DejaView: being interviewed, and caught and recognised shaving in the mirror!
Two photos from DejaView: being interviewed, and caught and recognised shaving in the mirror!
Today I got my own DejaView device to start to wear, play with, improve (and fix the bugs)! While we've had working devices and a working system for many months now, up until now any devices that we have had have been used by the rest of the research team and our clinicial collaborators in London.

Some of the photos from my first two days of wearing DejaView can be seen in the image:

The top photo was captured while myself and Paul Lewis were interviewed and filmed by a team from Sweden making a documentary about lifelogging (the documentary should appear later in the year!).

The bottom photo was captured while I was getting ready for work in the morning, where the reflection of me shaving in the mirror was captured by DejaView (which proceeded to recognise me and announce that I was looking at myself!)

For more information, click here.
 

#25

   

Keynote Speech given at EnHaNSS 2012
11th June 2012

Today I gave the keynote speech at the International Workshop on Algorithms and Concepts for Networked Sensing Systems Powered by Energy Harvesters (EnHaNSS'12) workshop in Antwerp, Belgium. The workshop was organised as part of the Internationl Conference on Networked Sensing Systems (INSS 2012).

In the keynote, I talked about the holistic design of energy harvesting sensor nodes. Energy harvesting sensor nodes are gaining increasing potential and research interest, but they are inherently complicated systems. Numerous interactions exist between the microgenerator, power processing circuitry, energy storage, processor and radio transceiver etc, and designing and optimising an isolated component does not necessarily translate to equivalent improvements at the system level. Efficient and effective design needs to take a holistic approach, and consider the system's multiple components and their interactions. In the presentation, I discussed different aspects of this holistic design process, from the design of generators, power processing circuitry and computation units through to system modelling, simulation and optimisation. Some of these aspects were illustrated in the context of case-studies, both in constrained and real applications, including a wireless sensor performing condition monitoring on a ferry engine which is powered by a tuneable vibration-based microgenerator. I also presented a range of data on energy availability that we have collected, analysed and made freely available to the community.

For more information, click here.
 

#23

   

Energy Harvesting 2012
28th March 2012

Attendees at Energy Harvesting 2012
Attendees at Energy Harvesting 2012
Following from the success of our conference "Energy Harvesting 2011", held in London last year, today we held this year's conference. Energy Harvesting 2012 was held in London on 28th March 2012.

Speakers included Prof Peter Woias (IMTEK, Germany), Frank Schmidt (CTO Enocean), Prof Vittorio Ferrari (University of Brescia, Italy), Roy Freeland (Perpetuum) and Prof Eric Yeatman (Imperial College, London).

The event provided a platform for disseminating energy-harvesting advances in the UK, and contained presentations from well-respected speakers from academia and industry, demonstrations from companies, and posters from postgraduate students. Around 100 participants attended from both industry and academia.

The event was very well received by all that attended, and we look forward to Energy Harvesting 2013!

For more information, click here.
 

#21

   

Energy Harvesting Network's Data Repository Launched
13th February 2012

Vibration Data from Ford Focus Engine
Vibration Data from Ford Focus Engine
The Energy Harvesting Network, coordinated by myself and Prof Steve Beeby at the University of Southampton, have launched the Network's 'Data Repository' - an online catalogue for researchers worldwide to share data on ambient energy availability - for example acceleration levels, solar irradience, or wind speeds. It is hoped that, by using a common dataset, this will encourage the comparitive evaluation of energy harvesters and fuel advances in the field.

Natuarlly, the repository will only suceed if it is adopted by the community and used; hence, we invite everyone working in energy harvesting to contribute data to it, and/or use the data that is available. To kick-start the process, we have made available a selection of the data that we have obtained through our research on the 'Holistic Energy Harvesting' project - this includes vibration data from cars, household appliances, machinary and structures.

See our press release on the data repository on EETimes.

For more information, click here.
 

#19

   

Press Coverage for Tactile Devices in Rehabilitation
14th November 2011

Our research on tactile devices for stroke rehabilitation has already received a fantastic amount of press coverage and public interest.

Some of this has been reported elsewhere on this webpage (for example our appearances in BBC radio and the 'FAST' government report), but a selection of the online coverage that it received (at least that which I have spotted) is listed below: I even received an email saying that it had featured as far away as the 'Borneo Post' and the 'Vietnam Tribune' newspapers!

For more information, click here.
 

#17

   

Awarded Prestigious Vice Chancellor's Teaching Award
25th July 2011

I was recently awarded a Vice Chancellor's Teaching Award for my work on incorporating online learning into ELEC1032: Engineering Challenges. This module is delivered to all first-year Electronic, Electrical and Electromechanical undergraduates in ECS (in 2010/11, 139 students). It is primarily skills-based and, in previous years, disengagement has been witnessed as the semester progresses. This year, I introduced the delivery of lecture material online with an aim to improve the learning experience and students' perception of the module.

All module material was categorised into one of two equally sized categories: one for background and factual material that could be 'disseminated' to students (to be delivered online), and the other where interaction and learning activities were necessary (to be delivered traditionally). This meant that students could watch these lectures when it fitted their personal learning styles. In a number of cases, the online lecture was used to teach the theoretical principles, while the subsequent traditional lecture delivered linked and appropriate learning activities, thus best exploiting the contact time. The online lectures were delivered using specially recorded videos (supplemented by printable lecture slides and other additional resources) on Blackboard, the institutional VLE. These were strategically scheduled into the module as if they were traditional lectures.

The changes were very well received by the students, with the overall module rating improving from 2.9 (static over the last three years) to 3.8. The changes have given students greater freedom in the way in which they learn, for example allowing them to watch lectures when it best suits their learning style, pause the lecture while they look up more information, and rewind and watch again difficult topics. This has also proved beneficial to international students, as the majority found the online lectures easier to understand, and were able to pause the lecture while they translated unknown words.

For more information, click here.
 

#15

   

Tactile Device Research on BBC Radio Solent's 'Drive Time'
5th April 2011

Being interviewed by BBC Radio Solent
Being interviewed by BBC Radio Solent
Dr Sara Demain and I appeared live today on BBC Radio Solent's 'Drive Time' show, and talked about our research on tactile devices for stroke rehabilitation.

This follows the a press release earlier in the week, that can be seen on the ECS website or, to give an example, on The Engineer. Our paper, titled 'Design and Qualitative Evaluation of Tactile Devices for Stroke Rehabilitation' will be presented tomorrow (06 April) at the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Assisted Living Conference.

The interview aired during the Steve Harris show, between 16:00-19:00 on 05 April 2011. A clip of the radio interview can be downloaded here (copyright BBC, 2011).

For more information, click here.
 

#13

   

Haptics Demo in Multidisciplinary Research Week
2nd February 2011

Discussing the research with attendees
Discussing the research with attendees
Multidisciplinary Research Week was a programme of activities aimed at showcasing different aspects of multidisciplinary work at the University of Southampton.

As a part of the week, we gave a demonstration of our haptic devices to attendees during a drop in session, where visitors could try out the devices and find out more about the research. We were also able to highlight the benefits that were obtained through a multidisciplinary approach to the research. One of the attendees commented:
"The varied applications are really interesting. I liked hearing how the technology could be used in the home, with rehabilitation possible using developed console games."
During the event, we were interviewed by BBC Radio Solent, and gave the reporter a demonstration of our devices. The interview aired during the Alex Dyke show, between 9:30-13:00 on 02 February 2011. A clip of the radio interview can be downloaded here (copyright BBC, 2011).

For more information, click here.
 

#11

   

Book on Wireless Sensor Network Applications
31st December 2010

I recently edited a book titled "Wireless Sensor Networks: Application-Centric Design". It is an open-access book, meaning that you can download and read it for free, by following the link below. My contribution (the preface) can also be downloaded in isolation from our ePrints server, at http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/21705/.

This book is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all WSN applications and deployments to date. Instead, it is a collection of state-of-the-art research papers discussing current applications and deployment experiences, but also the communication and data processing technologies that are fundamental in further developing solutions to applications. Whilst a common foundation is retained through all chapters, this book contains a broad array of often differing interpretations, configurations and limitations of WSNs, and this highlights the diversity of this ever-changing research area. The chapters have been categorised into three distinct sections: applications and case studies, communication and networking, and information and data processing. The readership of this book is intended to be postgraduate/postdoctoral researchers and professional engineers, though some of the chapters may be of relevance to interested master's level students.

For more information, click here.
 

#9

   

Crutch Research in Government Report
10th December 2010

Report on "Research and Development Work Relating to Assistive Technology"
Report on "Research and Development Work Relating to Assistive Technology"
Our research on instrumented crutches for rehabilitation has been featured in an annual government report on assistive technology. Our bit can be found on page 29 of the report (follow the link at the bottom of this news item).

The report is prepared by FAST (the Foundation of Assistive Technology), and is an annual publication by the Department of Health (UK Government). The report has a number of uses (including giving researchers an overview of other work in the field, and service providers information on new technologies and devices), but is also used by Government to highlight promising and successful areas of research that may require future funding.

The annual report is published pursuant to section 22 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970, and describes the wide range of government funded projects supporting the development, introduction and evaluation of assistive technology that might increase the range of activities and independence or well being of disabled and older people.

For more information, click here.
 

#7

   

Haptics Demoed at SoNG Outreach Event
18th November 2010

The Southampton Neuroscience Group (SoNG)
The Southampton Neuroscience Group (SoNG)
Our interdisciplinary research on haptic devices for tactile interaction was showcased at this year's SoNG 'Outreach' event'. The Outreach event was held to showcase research to both the University and selected school teachers, charities, patient groups and industrialists. At the event, we demonstrated some of the wearable tactile devices that we have produced through the project, and reported on the findings of their evaluation on human participants.

The Southampton Neuroscience Group (SoNG) is a network of more than 100 academics, clinicians, and practitioners. SoNG activities improve opportunities for interdisciplinary research, dialogue with stakeholders and links with the local community through public engagement and outreach.

For more information, click here.
 

#5

   

Energy Harvesting Book Chapter
30th June 2010

My book chapter on "Wireless Devices and Sensor Networks," that I co-authored with Dr Alex Weddell and Dr Nick Harris has just been published! The book, titled "Energy Harvesting for Autonomous Systems", is published by Artech House, and edited by Professor Neil White and Dr Steve Beeby. The majority of my chapter is (at least currently) available to read on Google Books.

The chapters of the book are:
  1. Introduction
  2. Wireless Devices and Sensor Networks
  3. Photovoltaic Energy Harvesting
  4. Kinetic Energy Harvesting
  5. Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting
  6. Power Management Electronics
  7. Energy Storage
  8. Case Study: Adaptive Energy-Aware Sensor Networks
  9. Concluding Remarks
"This unique resource provides a detailed understanding of the options for harvesting energy from localized, renewable sources to supply power to autonomous wireless systems. You are introduced to a variety of types of autonomous system and wireless networks and discover the capabilities of existing battery-based solutions, RF solutions, and fuel cells. The book focuses on the most promising harvesting techniques, including solar, kinetic, and thermal energy. You also learn the implications of the energy harvesting techniques on the design of the power management electronics in a system. This in-depth reference discusses each energy harvesting approach in detail, comparing and contrasting its potential in the field."

For more information, click here.
 

#3

   

Stands at Technology World 2009
24th November 2009

Technology World 2009
Technology World 2009
I have just returned from the Technology World 2009 event, where I manned two stands over the two-day event:
  1. The first stand was part of EPSRC's 'Impact!' display, where we presented research on intelligent sensing and energy harvesting.
  2. The second stand was for the Electronics KTN on the 'No Batteries Included' grand challenge, where we showcased research on energy harvesting electronics, and gave out information on our upcoming Energy Harvesting Network and Holistic Energy Harvesting projects.
Technology World 09 was held on 23 and 24 November 2009 at the Ricoh Arena in Coventry. It was a focal event for the ICT sector to showcase the best of UK technology to a national and international audience and to generate business for UK companies.
 

#1

   

Seminar Given at CENS, UCLA
30th July 2008

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Campus
The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Campus
I have spent a couple of days in the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the USA. It's been very interesting, and great to see the place where so much excellent WSN research is being done.

During the visit, Professor Neil White and I gave a seminar to CENS researchers on 'Energy Aware Remote Sensing', reflecting on the work that is being undertaken by researchers within the Electronic Systems and Devices (ESD) group and the Pervasive Systems Centre (PSC) at Southampton.

Later in the visit, we also give the seminar to researchers at the University of Duke, North Carolina.

For more information, click here.
 
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